Is the army looking for an excuse for military rule in Pakistan?

3 min read

Pakistan has been a puppet of the generals since birth. We have to understand that the person who laid the foundation of the state was actually not Muhammad Ali Jinnah but Major General Iskandar Mirza.

Jinnah is the architect of Pakistan; Because Jinnah died within a year of the birth of the country and Iskandar Mirzai is the real architect of Pakistan. Because, he not only ruled Pakistan in practical sense but also gave unlimited power to the generals. These generals have ruled Pakistan directly or indirectly for more than four decades and during this period none of the supposedly democratically elected civilian governments have completed their terms.

Imran Khan’s arrest and the reaction of his supporters is nothing short of shocking. From the looks of the situation, it seems that the entire incident is happening one after another as planned and pre-planned by the Pakistan Army.

It is hard for anyone to believe that in a country like Pakistan, an agitated mob can storm the army headquarters, set fire to the house of one of the core commanders and storm a military air base without any hindrance. It’s also hard to believe that the building that houses some of Pakistan’s most influential people has allowed protesters to enter almost unhindered.

It is beyond doubt that the Pakistan Army itself has orchestrated these protests and vandalism in order to create a perfect pretext for imposing martial law in the country. It is said, ‘Every country in the world has its own army and Pakistan is the only country, which has an army.’ Here, the army rules anyone from the prime minister’s couch to the arbitrariness. Pakistan is the only country where the prime minister is decided by the army and the elections are always popular.

When Imran Khan was elected as the Prime Minister, it was widely said that the army had rigged the vote to make him the Prime Minister. And when he was overthrown, the presence of that army was as clear as day to all. Even when Imran was arrested from the Islamabad High Court premises last Tuesday and a series of incidents took place in his wake, it seemed that none of this could have happened without the finger-twisting of the Pakistani army.

Apart from Tehreek-e-Taliban, Baloch insurgents and other armed groups, many international terrorist organizations are now active in Pakistan. These groups can take advantage of the unstable situation in the country. All in all, with the current course of events in Pakistan, it seems that something more destructive may happen in the future.

Imran Khan’s arrest has changed the entire scenario of the country. The moment his supporters took to the streets to declare a so-called jihad against the government, the military imposed nationwide curfews, shutting down the Internet, installing government intelligence agencies in every media office to keep the country’s media under surveillance, and firing on protesters in the streets.

Many analysts believe the country is headed for a civil war between the Pakistani establishment (the term used to refer to the ruling clique of Pakistan’s army and pro-military groups in the bureaucracy, politics, judiciary and industry) and Imran Khan’s supporters, and they know it, soon. The army will be able to suppress all kinds of protests. But the situation is bad now and this situation is going to affect multiple sectors of Pakistan. His countdown has already started.

With the rapid turn of events, Pakistan’s economic future is taking a turn for the worse. The country is now going through such an economic crisis that its foreign debt exceeds GDP and it has to repay five times the amount of its foreign exchange reserves as foreign debt installments.

Apart from Tehreek-e-Taliban, Baloch insurgents and other armed groups, many international terrorist organizations are now active in Pakistan. These groups can take advantage of the unstable situation in the country. All in all, with the current course of events in Pakistan, it seems that something more destructive may happen in the future.

Taken from Times Now , translated from English

  • Amit Bansal is a retired major in the Indian Army and an analyst of geography and international affairs.

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